Expressing her anguish about people taking to the streets on Friday to call on President Jacob Zuma to resign, she said: “I was concerned about all these theories about why people were marching and to me those people were not necessarily the ones protecting white monopoly capital.

After her much-shared and lengthy criticism on Facebook, she said the ANC had to fix its internal problems before 2019 or face a heavy defeat at the polls.

“We have leaders giving different messages and we are not sure what is going on.”

She said South Africans who had problems were being labelled instead of being offered solutions.

Expressing her anguish about people taking to the streets on Friday to call on President Jacob Zuma to resign, she said: “I was concerned about all these theories about why people were marching and to me those people were not necessarily the ones protecting [white] monopoly capital.

“That march – we ought to look at it as the ANC and ask ourselves, ‘What are we doing wrong?’ The South African flag can be flown so high by people from different walks of life who sacrifice everything to participate in this march.

“I was trying to appeal to my leaders to say: ‘Lead us, don’t confuse us’,” she said.In her lengthy Facebook post Khoza said the mass action on Friday was a sign that the ruling party was irrelevant, with chronic leadership incapacity.

“I once more choose to see the April 7 2017 marches across the country as not conspiracies of white monopoly capital but genuine concerns of the majority of marchers. I am a product of history. The marches I witnessed across the country were not different from women’s marches against pass laws. They were the same as the march against Mike Gatting’s disregard for international sanctions against apartheid South Africa,” Khoza wrote.

She said she had been victimised in the ANC for standing for the truth and expected it again.

“Politics of patronage has claimed the sanity of my ANC leaders. A triumphant story has turned tragic in my lifetime. The ANC is defining itself out of power when the majority of its people remain trapped in poverty, joblessness, dependency on state social grants.”

“Where to from here? I have no clue. One thing for sure is that you cannot fight against evil if your own soul is littered with the same.”

Khoza told Hinnewssa that she considered herself a revolutionary and would not dump the ANC.

“I remain in the ANC. I am saying: ‘Leadership, here is a challenge and what are we going to do?’ and all I am hearing are just labels. We need to do our own risk assessment and weigh the pros and cons. We must be objective.

“We should be worrying more about our internal politics. If we think that people don’t understand the value of their vote we are going to be in trouble, like how we lost Tshwane,” said Khoza.